PPP Catch-up 18/08/15

PPP Catch-up 18/08/15

Things have been really busy in the vegetable garden and we are getting back on top of things at last – see the photos below. At the moment we are harvesting kale, chard, lettuce, carrots, beetroots, onions, basil, rhubarb, mini curcurbits called Melothrie from Real Seeds (which are running riot – see picture above) and cucumbers. Tomatoes are ripening nicely. We tried two varieties this year (also from Real Seeds), Red Zebra and Dr Carolyn (which apparently has an exceptional flavour) and look forward to trying them. Cabbages are growing well and we have also planted some oriental greens and cauliflowers too.

We have also been using the nettle tea (see photo below) that I made a while ago on the leafy greens and heavy feeder vegetables such as courgettes and squash. We have tried this in previous years and it is a great way to use nettles (other than in cooking of course). You could use comfrey or seaweed instead. Be warned – this stuff smells bad (and our dogs have a weird fascination for it). We dilute it 10:1.

Ketosis experiment was relegated to the back-burner in the midst of a stressful couple of months. I suspect that my intake of berries and other starchy vegetable produce has pushed me out on more than one occasion but I am not worrying about this too much at the moment…

Had some fantastic beef again from John and Patsy at Bryn Belted Galloway. See their new Facebook page here and check out the recent addition to their herd called Bryn Bella! We love the slow cooked brisket that just melts in the mouth. We can’t recommend their meat enough!

Also tried some 100% pasture-fed hogget from Sarah and Nick at Black Welsh Lamb, at Pen y Wyrlod Farm in Monmouthshire. We cooked chops first (very simply) to get the true taste of the meat and the flavour was fantastic. We then cooked a hoggett, shallot and date tagine with the shoulder. The meat was incredibly tender and held up its taste against the spices. We look forward to trying other cuts. Like John and Patsy, Sarah and Nick are great ambassadors for the 100% pasture-fed movement.

Tried some beetroot and courgette crisps this week when cooking for Paleo friends. Complete success – they were delicious although it was hilarious how much they shrink (see the photo below). We ran out of time to do any more so they were quite precious! So much better than those steeped in vegetable oil that you buy from the shop and we will definitely be making these again.

 

Around the web

In light of the ongoing debate around the issue of fat in the media, is it any wonder that people are so confused and fed up with mainstream dietary advice that apparently flips from one position to another? Why follow any advice at all if the experts are likely to do another u-turn in a few years – or even a few days – time? After the headlines announcing that it is fine to eat saturated fat, we see a BBC News article declaring that ‘Low-fat diets ‘better than cutting carbs’ for weight loss’ even though the original paper declares: ‘reducing dietary carbohydrate from the RC (reduced carbohydrate) diet (with a corresponding addition of fat to maintain calories) was predicted to decrease body fat to a greater extent than the experimental RC diet.’ This is just plain confusing…

In addition to this, an article in the Quarterly Review of Biology which argued that carbohydrates was ‘critical for the accelerated expansion of the human brain over the last million years’ caused quite a stir. Cue the headlines that the Paleo diet is plain wrong and is all about eating meat and zero carbs etc. Norah Gedgaudas wrote an excellent reply to this, reminding us of the importance of the consumption of fat to human health and in particular to brain development, as well as questioning the motives behind the continued insistence that carbohydrates should make up a large percentage of the human diet. A really great read.

‘Innumerable corporate interests stand to profit handsomely by investing in the promotion of carbohydrate-based diets for every man, woman and child on planet Earth. They are enormously cheap to produce, highly profitable and they keep everyone perpetually hungry.’ Norah Gedgaudas

Diabetes Warrior Steve Cooksey also posted an excellent response to the paper relating his own experience and experimentation in managing his diabetes through lifestyle changes:

‘Ultimately it makes absolutely no difference to me how our ancestor’s ate.  I have eaten high, moderate and low carbohydrate diets in numerous experiments;  I am thriving on the meal plan that works best for me, a very low-carb, high fat,  paleo style meal plan.’ Steve Cooksey

A reminder that if it works for you – don’t be put off by the headlines.

The news that Diabetes cases have soared by 60% in the past decade and that Diabetes accounts for 10% of the NHS drug bill provides a reminder that when it comes to health in the UK, things are looking bleak. I had a quick look at Diabetes on the NHS Choices website which – in the case of Type 2 Diabetes – advises:

‘It’s therefore important to take preventative measures by making any necessary lifestyle changes, such as eating more healthily, losing weight (if you’re overweight) and becoming more physically active.’

Clicking on the links regarding healthy eating take us to pages which recommend ‘Plenty of potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy foods’, as well as suggestions for breakfast that includes cereals such as porridge and wholegrains with added fruit (bananas), wholemeal or granary bread and sugar-free jams and marmalades (presumably with added sweeteners). Recommendations for snacks include ‘lower-sugar (and lower-fat) versions of your favourite snacks’.

I just don’t see anything changing unless there is a fundamental, root and branch rethink on dietary advice in this country.

 

On to brighter things!

Update on Polyfaces: The Film produced by Lisa Heenan and Isaebella Doherty of Regrarians (Australia). This is a documentary film about Joel Salatin’s Polyface Farm in Virginia and is about to preview at film festivals. I was lucky enough to see Darren Doherty and Lisa Heenan of Regrarians, as well as Joel Salatin speak (twice!) at the Savory Institute Conference in 2014 and was totally blown away by the work that they do, so I can’t wait to see this film.

‘Regrarians Ltd. is an Australian-based non-profit organisation whose primary objective is to the regenerative enhancement of the biosphere’s ecosystem processes. It does so through delivering world-class education, media, advocacy & extension to farmers & consumers across the world, having had nearly 15,000 people attend its events since 2007.’

We Love Paleo, a documentary film about the Paleo lifestyle is due to premiere in London on August 31st 2015, 9pm at The Gate Cinema, Notting Hill, W11 3JZ. Directed by Caroleen Moise Reimann and produced by Tjard Reimann, this documentary film will feature people whose lives have been changed through adopting a Paleo lifestyle. Hopefully it will raise awareness of the movement and encourage people to look beyond the increasingly silly headlines and articles about Paleo in the news recently. Can’t catch it in London but look forward to hearing all about it and watching the video when available.

A Probiotic Life is currently in production and you can view the trailer here. Film makers Toni Harman and Alex Wakeford are the team behind Microbirth (which I have yet to see). The documentary features interviews with doctors, nutritionists and families on the importance of the microbiome to health and looks at the cutting edge research taking place in this fast-moving area of science. Very excited about this!

 

Videos and podcasts

Lovely short video from Rebecca Hosking and Tim Green from Village Farm in Devon on ‘Building Soil with Regenerative Agriculture’.

Found this video from Stacey Murphy of Backyard Farmyards5 Tips for New Growers: Save Time Energy & Money. Definitely worth a watch – particularly the tips about increasing your growing area by plotting shade throughout the year and also how to prioritise jobs in the garden. Stacey produces between 25 and 80lb of produce weekly on a 450 square foot site!

Great podcast from Robb Wolf with Dr. Charles Sydnor on Grass Fed Cattle and The Future of Sustainability. Check it out!

Very interesting talk by Dr Ron Rosedale on cancer from the 2013 Annual International IPT (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) /IPTLE conference via Me and My Diabetes website. This was reposted on Facebook a few weeks ago and I bookmarked it to listen to it but can’t remember who posted the link so hat-tip to you! Dr Rosedale features in the excellent Keto Clarity book and advocates a high fat, moderate protein, low carbohydrate real food approach and in particular is an advocate of lowering protein to around 1g or less per lean (ideal) bodyweight. This is an extremely fascinating talk concerning the role of insulin, leptin and the mTOR pathway in disease. Dr Rosedale leaves us with this warning:

‘Your health and lifespan will mostly be determined by the proportion of fat versus sugar you burn over a lifetime.  I’ve said that for 20 years.  I’ve not found anything to contradict it.  All the evidence that has occurred in the last 20 years has supported that one statement. Everything there is to know about health, and aging, can be summarized right there.  Your health and lifespan will be determined by the proportion of fat versus sugar that you burn over a lifetime.’ Dr Rosedale

Let’s be clear – when Dr Rosedale says ‘sugar’ he includes non-fiber starch such as potatoes, bread (including wholemeal), rice, pasta, cereal, corn and all grains that eventually get turned to sugar by the body. In light of the recent headlines concerning Diabetes, this advice would be well-heeded…

PPP Round-Up 23/04/15

PPP Round-Up 23/04/15

Mega-busy time in the vegetable garden at the moment – read my article Return to the Garden for more on that. Seeds progressing nicely, despite a mouse/bird attack on the lower shelf of the staging in the greenhouse. All replanted and we will just have to cease using the bottom shelf until we decide what to do. This means space is limited so seeds and seedlings have taken over the house!

Enjoying lamb breasts roasted with garlic and herbs (above) – hugely economical and taste superb. Will try stuffed and rolled lamb breast this week.

First sauerkraut experiment a massive success and am addicted to it! Beats that stuff they sell in massively overpriced jars in the deli. Next on list: Kimchi…

IMG_8948

Using half minced beef and half minced beef heart for dishes like burgers and bolognese sauce. So delicious! Great way to get heart into the diet.

Paid a visit to John and Patsy Price to get some fantastic 100% pasture raised beef.

Currently eating the last of 2014’s swiss chard and kale before pulling them up. Also we have the first rhubarb of the year appearing. Stewed with cinnamon and mixed spice (no sugar!) and served with coconut cream and vanilla.

Ketosis going very well and feeling great!

 

News

It’s that time of the year again – the awesome Paleo f(x) is here! Running Friday, April 24th to Sunday, April 26th this is the biggest event in Paleo with a stellar line-up of speakers. There are some fantastic talks, in particular Travis Christofferson of Single Cause Single Cure and author of Tripping Over the Truth: a metabolic theory of cancer talking about The Metabolic Theory of Cancer: The Evidence, Consequences and Treatments. Really happy to also see Chris Kerston of the Savory Institute talking on Eating Healthy Meat to Save the Planet! Emily Dean’s talk on The Microbiome and Mental Health looks great. Dr Michael Ruscio’s talk The Gut Microbiota; Clinical Pearls Vs. Marketing Ploys & Regaining Your Ancestral Gut will be interesting to get a balanced view on the latest research into microbes and the gut. I listened to the first couple of Dr Ruscio’s podcasts here and they are very good. Josh Whiton’s talk The Best Meat is Illegal to Buy: Ending the Ban on Wild Hunted Meat would also be one to attend. I had no idea that most of the venison consumed in America is shipped from New Zealand and it would be good to get a US perspective on hunting. Wish I was going to Austin this year but hopefully back again next year and until then, look forward to catching up with all the videos when they become available.

Very excited to hear that Human Food Project is planning to spend some time with the Reindeer Herders of northern Mongolia – look forward to hearing more about that. Robb Wolf had also posted a link to this article: Mongolia’s Meat Diet: An Inconvenient Truth for Veganism which is a great read. Check out some amazing pictures of Mongolian Reindeer tribes here.

Grass-fed meat vital for a healthy diet, MPs are told – via Farm2Fork Great to see the health benefits of 100% pasture-fed meat being promoted by Professor Robert Pickard, of Cardiff University at the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on beef and lamb.

 

 

Website articles

My favourite article of the month has to be Toby Hemenway’s Permaculture: The Design Arm of a Paradigm Shift. I first heard about Tony from an interview called Liberation Permaculture he gave on the Survival Podcast (which I found via a fermentation website). I was fascinated by what he has to say and felt that his philosophy chimes perfectly with Paleo and with the holistic management approach of organisations such as the Savory Institute. I have been listening to Toby a lot in the last few days.

‘After your world changes, there’s plenty of work to be done. That work is permaculture.’

Antibody against ?-gliadin 33-mer peptide: Is the key initiating factor for development of multiple sclerosis during gluten sensitivity? via Robb Wolf – a ‘must-read’. The forthcoming research has the potential to be hugely important for the study of autoimmune conditions.

Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management: Critical review and evidence base – check out this important article from quite a team!

Worth mentioning the following points in full:

‘Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They are proposed as the most well-established, least controversial results. It is not known who decides what constitutes evidence-based medicine but we feel that these points are sufficiently strong that the burden of proof rests on critics…

Whatever the extent to which the correlation between carbohydrate consumption and diabetes is causal, the lack of association between the levels of dietary fat and diabetes in humans is of real significance. A lack of association is generally considered strong evidence for a lack of causality…

In practice, reduced-carbohydrate diets are not generally high-protein diets except in comparison with low levels recommended in high-carbohydrate diets. It is also generally recommended that carbohydrate is replaced by fat…

Several large and expensive clinical studies have been carried out since the so-called diet–heart hypothesis was framed in the middle of the 20th century [40,41]. From the original Framingham study [42] to the WHI [26], as well as more than a dozen additional studies, have failed to show an association between dietary lipids and risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD)…

There is now a large volume of literature of both scientific papers [43–47] and popular books [48–51] documenting the failure of attempts to support the diet–heart hypothesis. Few rebuttals have been offered [52]. The very strong recommendations from health agencies predicted that none of these trials should fail. In fact, almost all of them have failed…

Dietary SFA does not correlate with CVD. On the other hand, it is increasingly understood that plasma SFAs are associated with increased risk for CVD and insulin resistance [59]. in humans, plasma SFAs do not correlate with dietary saturated fat but, rather, are more dependent on dietary carbohydrates [5,60–62]…

Total and/or LDL cholesterol are the most commonly assessed lipid markers for CVD risk despite the general recognition that they are not good predictors. Several other parameters have been shown to provide stronger evidence of risk and these tend to be reliably improved by dietary carbohydrate restriction. These include apolipoprotein (apo) B [71], ratio of total cholesterol to HDL, higher populations of the smaller dense LDL known as pattern B [72,73], as well as the ratio of apoB to apoA1. The ratio of TG to HDL, which is also improved more by carbohydrate restriction is taken as a correlate of the smaller dense LDL, which is not routinely measured…

Dietary carbohydrate restriction, because of its increased effectiveness in glycemic control, frequently leads to reduction and often complete elimination of medication in type 2 diabetes…

Finally, it should be recognized that the use of low carbohydrate diets is not a recent experiment and may well approximate the diet used by much of humanity for tens of thousands of years before the rise of agriculture…

Replacement of carbohydrate with fat or, in some cases, with protein, is beneficial in both types of diabetes leading to better glycemic control, weight loss, cardiovascular risk markers, and reduction in medication. This is what we know…

Both the scientific [92,93] and popular literature [94] have been unrestrained in attributing harm to fructose. Generally, fructose is known to have unique effects compared with glucose, although most of these are seen on a high-carbohydrate diet [95] and there may be little difference as carbohydrate is lowered. It is likely that on a low-carbohydrate diet, most fructose that is consumed will be converted to glucose. We have provided a perspective on the metabolism of fructose [96] where we emphasize its integration into general carbohydrate metabolism. The fact that up to 60% of ingested fructose can be converted to glucose makes the analysis of which sugar does what very difficult…

Given the current state of research funding and the palpable bias against low carbohydrate approaches [4], it is unlikely that an RCT can be performed that will satisfy everybody. The seriousness of diabetes suggests that we have enough evidence of different types to reevaluate our current recommendations for treatment…

We would recommend that government or private health agencies hold open hearings on these issues in which researchers in carbohydrate restriction can make their case. We think that traditional features of the analysis of evidence such as vigorous cross-examination should be part of the process…

How Networks Bring Down Experts (The Paleo Example) – hat-tip to Mr Wolf. I really loved this article:

 ‘…leadership is earned not by sitting atop an institutional hierarchy with the plumage of a PhD, but by contributing, experimenting, communicating and learning with the rest of a far bigger hive mind.’

Metabolic and physiologic effects from consuming a hunter-gatherer (Paleolithic)-type diet in type 2 diabetes – abstract (full article behind pay wall):

‘Even short-term consumption of a Paleolithic-type diet improved glucose control and lipid profiles in people with type 2 diabetes compared with a conventional diet containing moderate salt intake, low-fat dairy, whole grains and legumes.’

Neuroscience: an epileptic target: Interesting abstract (full article behind pay wall) regarding the development of drugs to treat epilepsy that mimic the metabolic effects of a ketogenic diet via LDH inhibition: ‘…the first anti-epileptic drug known to act on a metabolic pathway.’

Scientists identify novel mechanism by which ketogenic diet could delay effects of aging

‘Dr. Verdin and colleagues found that at lower concentrations, BOHB helps protect cells from “oxidative stress”-which occurs as certain molecules build to toxic levels in the body and contributes to the aging process.’

Beta-hydroxybutyrate is the primary ketone body in the blood.

One of the many criticisms of the Paleo diet is that it is potentially low in calcium. Check out this excellent article from Chris Kresser: How To Keep Your Bones Healthy On A Paleo Diet. There are some lovely foods in the top ten sources of calcium, including sesame seeds (wiz up tahini, garlic, olive oil, a little water and lemon juice and parsley to make a creamy salad dressing), tinned salmon and sardines, spinach…

New Research Shows Poorly Understood “Leaky Gut Syndrome” Is Real, May Be the Cause of Several Diseases via Ethical Omnivore Movement

Bring in the cows: grazing may be the best hope for a threatened butterfly – via Savory Institute. Really lovely article highlighting the importance of intelligently managed ruminants to biodiversity:

‘One of his goals was to dispel the widespread impression that cows are always bad for conservation. While ill-controlled herds have damaged landscapes across the West, Weiss says, well-managed herds can help preserve native ecosystems, including these flowery grasslands.’

Vegan Zealots And ‘Meat Kills The Planet’ Nonsense – Tom fights the fight yet again in this great article! An excellent argument for the important role that ruminants play in creating a healthy and sustainable biosystem.

World’s oldest stone tools discovered in Kenya

‘…tool making apparently began before the birth of our genus.’

The FDA’s phony nutrition science: How Big Food and Agriculture trumps real science — and why the government allows it

How the recommended low levels of salt in your diet might actually be dangerous – Interesting article on salt – time for a rethink on guidelines? Heard that one before!

 

 

Videos and Podcasts

A lovely video here about Conygree Farm, based in the Cotswolds who keep rare breed Cotswold and pedigree Lleyn sheep, Traditional Hereford (as opposed to crossed Hereford) cattle and native breed pigs, producing lamb, hogget, mutton, beef and pork. I first heard about this farm via the PFLA, so if you are looking for a supplier of pasture fed beef and lamb (and hogget!) in the Cotswolds area – check them out. Nice to see a mention of Deerhounds too!!

 

Books

Really enjoying reading Swallow This: Serving Up the Food Industry’s Darkest Secrets by Joanna Blythman. Check out my article on Joanna’s recent radio interview here.

‘These days cooking is a powerful political statement, a small daily act of resistance that gives us significantly more control of our lives…

The prevailing sentiment amongst food manufacturers is that the less we have a mental picture of how our food is made, the better.’

Joanna explains that when questioned about their methodologies, the implication from the food industry is that ‘…anyone who is suspicious of processed food is an irrational, confused hysteric.’

The description of some of the things on offer at the Food Ingredients trade show is mind-boggling.

Great read so far.

Gaia’s Garden: A Guide to Home-scale Permaculture by Toby Hemenway. Would really like to read this after listening to Toby’s presentations online – looks hugely interesting.

The Good Gut: Taking Control of Your Weight, Your Mood, and Your Long-term Health (available to pre-order from Random House Publishers).

 

Websites

The Conygree Farm video above was posted on Grow Eat Gather – a really nice new website that promotes locally grown, real food in the UK.

PPP Round-Up 28/03/15

PPP Round-Up 28/03/15

Great article from Caveman Doctor regarding supplements for cancer patients: Never, Ever Drink This “Nutritious” Beverage. The Doc has been posting some fantastic articles recently.

Posted my reply to the recent Guardian article by Jason Wilson: Paleo: ‘Anthropologically naive’, intellectually bankrupt’ and ‘anti-feminist’? If you haven’t read the original article it is definitely worth checking out. Fascinating to hear how people perceive the Paleo scene.

Headline of the week surely has to go to: Daily bowl of quinoa could save your life, says Harvard University. You can read the original paper here. Quite interesting to see who funded the study:

Sources of support: This study is funded by an unrestricted research fund from NutraSource. Dr. Qi was supported by grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (HL071981), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (DK091718), the Boston Obesity Nutrition Research Center (DK46200), and United States–Israel Binational Science Foundation Grant 2011036. Dr. Qi was a recipient of the American Heart Association Scientist Development Award (0730094 N). Funding from NutraSource. There were no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Nutrasource: ‘We are dedicated to making our clients’ products better from concept to claim’

I had a look to see what some of those organisations recommend regarding diet:

The NHLBI recommend the following regarding saturated fats, cholesterol and heart disease:

‘Importantly, most foods that are high in dietary cholesterol such as high fat meat and dairy products are also high in saturated fat. Saturated and trans fats raise blood LDL cholesterol and high levels of these fats have been associated with higher risk of heart disease.  The ACC/AHA Panel also recommended replacing saturated and trans fats with unsaturated vegetable sources, such as olive or canola oil, to lower blood LDL cholesterol levels. Saturated fats are found in fatty cuts of meat, poultry with skin, whole-milk dairy foods, lard, butter, and coconut and palm oils.  Trans fats are found in some bakery products and stick margarines.  ‘  See here for further info.

The NIDDK recommend the following for diabetics:

6-10 servings of starch per day. ‘Starches are bread, grains, cereal, pasta, and starchy vegetables like corn and potatoes. They provide carbohydrate, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Whole grain starches are healthier because they have more vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Eat some starches at each meal. Eating starches is healthy for everyone, including people with diabetes. Starches include: bread, pasta, corn, pretzels, potatoes, rice, crackers, cereal, tortillas, beans, yams, lentils.’ See here for further info.

 

Prehistoric Stone Tools Bear 500,000-Year-Old Animal Residue – great article:

‘As the human brain expanded, however, it required more substantial nourishment — namely fat and meat — to sustain it…

The research, published recently in PLOS One, represents the first scientifically verified direct evidence for the precise use of Paleolithic stone tools: to process animal carcasses and hides…

Fracturing rocks in order to butcher and cut animal meat represents a key biological and cultural milestone.’

See the original article here.

Look forward to reading Diabetes Warrior’s posts. Steve has been experimenting with adding higher amounts of fat to his Primal eating plan and is charting the results on his blog. Great so far!

It was Epilepsy Awareness Day on March 26th – check out the work of Matthew’s Friends. MF posted a link to this article in the Guardian Neurology Supplement detailing the increasing use of dietary therapies in the treatment of epilepsy and other diseases.

Robb Wolf posted a link to an article on emulsifiers Food Additives Feed the Fire, published in Nature magazine. I bought the article (short but extremely interesting). The findings suggest that ‘emulsifiers seem to induce the development of intestinal inflammation and metabolic syndrome in mice by disrupting the composition of the microbiota.’ The experiment used lower doses than those allowed in human food. Here is an explanation of emulsifiers in food.

Great response to the Dean Ornish article on protein diets in the New York Times from Dr Dan Eades – see the original article by Ornish here and see Dr Eades response here. Hat-tip to Caveman Doctor.

We love Moroccan and Lebanese food, so this Paleo Moroccan Feast from The Clothes Make the Girl caught my eye. It looks delicious.

I have been making sauerkraut – see photo above. Yes I know I am the last person to try making this! I used white and red cabbage, a little carrot, garlic, chilli pepper and ginger. It is fermenting away in the dark and we look forward to trying the results (assuming everything goes well). For more on all things fermentable, check out Sandor Katz’s website Wild Fermentation. His book The Art of Fermentation looks fantastic.

For those of you out there that tolerate dairy – check out this Feta, Nigella and Red Pepper dip from the excellent Bertie’s Food and Drink. Apart from butter, I don’t eat much diary but will very occasionally have some cheese. We tried this dip and it is wonderful!

Ate a lovely roast breast of new season lamb; a cheap and delicious cut.

Ketogenic experiment going well and feeling great.

PPP Round-Up: 22/03/15

PPP Round-Up: 22/03/15

Here’s what I have been up to:

Looking forward to hearing all about Paleo f(x) 2015. Can’t wait to see the videos. The talk by Travis Christofferson on the Metabolic Theory of Cancer and Emily Deans’ talk on the Microbiome and Mental Health look very interesting.

Great news! The LCHF conference could be coming to the UK in 2016!

R bought us a Berkey Water Filter to filter out heavy metals and other chemicals and nasty stuff from the tap water. No chemical smells too!

Tracking ketosis

Tracking my ketones with urine strips and wondering whether to get a Ketonix breathalyser. Averaging 1.5 – 4 mmol on the strips over the last month. Feeling good despite stressful time recently.

Reading some helpful Keto websites:

http://www.ketogenic-diet-resource.com/

http://www.ketoisland.com/

http://keto-calculator.ankerl.com/

Reddit Keto site

Keto Q&A – excellent intro to keto

List of keto/low carb related videos

Videos and Podcasts

Entertaining documentary Eat to Live Forever featuring Paleo. A must-watch (for all the wrong reasons).

I have been watching the Low Carb Down Under videos – here. Some great stuff and led me to Tim Noakes’s good-looking Real Meal Revolution website.

Watched the Surviving Terminal Cancer film. Hugely interesting film about combination therapies. Found it after reading this article in the news.

Excellent interview with Professor Thomas Seyfried here. A must-listen!

Reading about the Grazing for Change conference in Chico CA.

Was I the last Paleo person in the world to watch Jay Wortman’s My Big Fat Diet?! Can’t believe I haven’t seen it before. Check it out here. Also check out Jay Wortman’s blog here.

BBC Inside Health: Bowel Bacteria and Faecal Transplants – Interesting article on gut bacteria transplants and the impact on metabolic syndrome and neurological conditions (about 17:30 in). As far back as the 1600’s physicians postulated a link between neurological disorders and the gut…

Listening to some of the SealFit Unbeatable Mind podcasts (I probably don’t conform to their average listener!!). Great episodes Beyond Paleo and Primal Diets with Robb Wolf and Supercharging Your Sleep with Kirk Parsley. Also check out A Personal Ethos with Colonel Bob Schoultz – very interesting guy. He studied philosophy and is very much influenced by Greek thinkers such as the Stoics. Listen to a great anecdote about Aristotle and SEAL training! Philosophy is for all of us and one of the greatest gifts is to bring the lessons of philosophy to people in a clear and simple way (this is a whole other blog post). This is exactly what Socrates achieved. When one reads Plato, we are struck by Socrates’ patient and gentle teaching. This led me over to Colonel Schoultz’s blog and there are some very interesting and thoughtful posts on there. Check it out – particularly the latest post On Hardship and Suffering. I look forward to reading more.

How our microbes make us who we are – excellent Ted Talk by Rob Knight. Also Congratulations to Rob and Team for winning the Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science: ‘For groundbreaking research on microbial communities and the development of computational tools that honed the analysis of microbial data.’

Books

Top of the book list:

Swallow This: Serving Up the Food Industry’s Darkest Secrets by Joanna Blythman. Check out my article on Joanna’s recent radio interview here. Can’t wait to read this!

Doctoring Data by Malcolm Kendrick – author of The Great Cholesterol Con. Looks like a great read. Check out Tom Naughton’s review here.

The World Turned Upside Down: The Second Low-Carbohydrate Revolution by Richard D. Feinman. Can’t seem to find this in any other format but Kindle. Was released last year but I’ve only just heard about it.

Re-reading Volek and Phinney books:

The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living

The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance

Looks interesting: Ketone Power: Superfuel for Optimal Mental Health and Ultimate Physical Performance by Cristian Vlad Zot

News

I have been following the Pete Evans controversy. Lots of rubbish has been written including this nonsense from Jason Wilson at the Guardian, which warrants a separate blog post (currently writing).

Paleo elsewhere in the news: Caveman Diet goes mainstream: how to be ‘paleo-ish

Read the latest report from Matthew’s Friends regarding their involvement with the Astro Brain Tumour Fund in connection with the Ketogenic Diet

Ten-year study highlights effectiveness of ketogenic diets

Statins increase risk of diabetes by almost 50 per cent, study finds

Parkinson’s link to statins: Calls to end widespread use of the drug

Brits go nuts for coconut oil

Three to five cups of coffee a day could reduce the risk of heart attack

Johnson & Johnson Bets On Alzheimer’s Vaccine, Disease Prediction, Human ‘Microbiome’ – very interesting!

Fluoride in drinking water may trigger depression and weight gain, warn scientists

Government obesity adviser Susan Jebb took research funding from Coca-Cola – here’s Susan Jebb’s latest article for the BBC a few days ago Why not nanny people about healthy diet?

The U.S. government is poised to withdraw longstanding warnings about cholesterol

Website articles

Cancer Recurrence May Not be What You Think (what it really is and what can be done to prevent it) – excellent article from Single Cause Single Cure Cancer Foundation. ‘When the true nature of recurrence is combined with the evidence that cancer could be a disease caused by dysfunctional mitochondria, the cancer survivor is never taken out of the fight.’

Latest blog post from Dr Malcolm Kendrick on NICE

The Lie That’s Killing Us: Pre-Diabetes

Mental Health: Thinking from the Gut – amazing article!

Diet, Depression, and the Microbiome – from the excellent Emily Deans

To foster complex societies, tell people a god is watching

Kissing your dog could improve your health, scientists say

Savory Institute: Finalist in Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Earth Challenge

Rediscovering my Land and Local Food – lovely article from Slow Food

Recommendation for vitamin D intake was miscalculated, is far too low, experts say

Lack of sleep may increase the risk of obesity and diabetes, study finds

Does a high salt diet combat infections?

Paleofication: Just Because The Label Says Paleo Doesn’t Mean It’s Healthy… – really good article and food for thought

Widely used food additives promotes colitis, obesity and metabolic syndrome, shows study of emulsifiers

Anti-inflammatory mechanism of dieting and fasting revealed

Interesting websites

Soul Nutrition – very interesting website recommended by the awesome Matthew’s Friends. ‘Our current focus is on supporting research into the potential use of ketogenic dietary therapy for brain tumour patients, to be used alongside all existing cancer treatments available on the NHS.’

I Breathe, I’m Hungry – some nice-looking low carb recipes on here!

Body by Science